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Hockey Canada, Bauer Hockey extend equipment, grow-the-game partnership

Top Canadian teams to continue wearing BAUER in new eight-year partnership that will continue collaborative initiatives to advance the game for new, existing players

May 18, 2018

TORONTO – May 18, 2018 – Hockey Canada and Bauer Hockey have extended their partnership through a new eight-year deal that will see the nation’s top teams provided with equipment from the world’s top brand, and a continued collaboration on opportunities to increase participation, welcome new players and engage existing players.

“One of our team’s highest points of pride is our continued partnership with Hockey Canada because it is an example of the game’s best at a variety of age levels selecting BAUER for their game,” said Ed Kinnaly, CEO of Bauer Hockey. “More than the equipment, this partnership allows us to come together with Hockey Canada to advance our shared missions, such as when we created The First Shift in 2013 together, and we’re looking forward to continuing this collaborative approach over the next eight years.”

For the past 45 years, Bauer Hockey and Hockey Canada have been partners, and continuing a tradition since 1996, Bauer Hockey will be the official equipment provider of Hockey Canada’s national teams. Canada’s national team players will exclusively wear BAUER helmets, gloves, visors and goal masks, including at the 2019 IIHF World Junior Championship when it returns to Canadian ice in Vancouver and Victoria, B.C., in December 2018.

“Our partnership with BAUER provides Hockey Canada with the best equipment for our national men’s, women’s, and para hockey teams, while also aligning us with a like-minded organization that cares about growing the game at the grassroots level,” said Scott Smith, president and chief operating officer at Hockey Canada. “We look forward to eight more years of collaboration with BAUER from the grassroots level to our high-performance teams.”

In addition to the equipment partnership, Bauer Hockey and Hockey Canada will continue to collaborate in areas where they have shared missions. Over the last several years, the two organizations combined resources and expertise to create, launch and expand The Canadian Tire First Shift, a successful program that welcomes new-to-hockey families to the game.

Today in partnership with Canadian Tire it is offered in hundreds of communities across Canada. Bauer Hockey and Hockey Canada will continue to identify and develop other initiatives to further advance the game for both new and existing players, including activation at major hockey tournaments and all IIHF events hosted by Hockey Canada.

To learn more about Hockey Canada, visit www.HockeyCanada.ca.

163 players invited to Canada's Program of Excellence summer camps

Junior, under-18 and under-17 prospects on the ice across Canada in July

NR.047.24
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July 16, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada has invited 163 players to participate in its Program of Excellence summer camps – Canada’s National Junior Team Summer Showcase, Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team selection camp and Canada’s national under-17 development camp.

“We are thrilled for the opportunity to host summer camps across our Program of Excellence this year and gain valuable insights into the development of our up-and-coming athletes,” said senior vice-president of high performance and hockey operations Scott Salmond (Creston, BC). “The athletes will gain experience in the operations of our program ahead of the 2024 U17 World Challenge, the 2024 Hlinka Gretzky Cup and the highly anticipated 2025 IIHF World Junior Championship in Ottawa.”

Forty-two players - four goaltenders, 13 defencemen and 25 forwards – have been invited to Canada’s National Junior Team Summer Showcase, July 28 to Aug. 3 at the WFCU Centre in Windsor, Ontario, and south of the border in Plymouth, Michigan.

The camp roster features 38 players who have been selected in the NHL Draft, including 17 first-round picks: Colby Barlow (WPG), Cole Beaudoin (UHC), Oliver Bonk (PHI), Berkly Catton (SEA), Easton Cowan (TOR), Sam Dickinson (SJS), Tij Iginla (UHC), Cayden Lindstrom (CBJ), Jett Luchanko (PHI), Tanner Molendyk (NSH), Bradly Nadeau (CAR), Zayne Parekh (CGY), Calum Ritchie (COL), Beckett Sennecke (ANA), Matthew Wood (NSH), Brayden Yager (PIT) and Carter Yakemchuk (OTT).

The player selection process was led by Salmond and the management group, which includes Peter Anholt (Naicam, SK/Lethbridge, WHL) and Brent Seabrook (Tsawwassen, BC) with assistance from senior manager of hockey operations Benoit Roy (Sudbury, ON). Head coach Dave Cameron (Kinkora, PE/Ottawa, OHL) and assistant coaches Sylvain Favreau (Orleans, ON/Drummondville, QMJHL), Mike Johnston (Dartmouth, NS/Portland, WHL) and Chris Lazary (Toronto, ON/Saginaw, OHL) were also involved in the process.

As part of Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team selection camp, 41 players – four goaltenders, 12 defencemen and 25 forwards – have been invited to compete to represent Canada at the 2024 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, scheduled for Aug. 5-10 in Edmonton, Alberta. The selection camp, set for July 27-30 at the WinSport Event Centre in Calgary, will include a pair of Red-Black games on July 29-30. The roster includes five players who won gold at the 2024 IIHF U18 World Championship (Desnoyers, Hamilton, Ivankovic, McKenna, Schaefer).

Head scout Byron Bonora (Brooks, AB) led the player selection process with assistance from Salmond. U18 Program of Excellence management group lead Dave Brown (Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON/Erie, OHL), head coach Kris Mallette (Kelowna, BC/Kelowna, WHL) and assistant coaches Gordie Dwyer (Dalhousie, NB/Acadie-Bathurst, QMJHL) and Ryan Oulahen (Newmarket, ON/North Bay, OHL) also provided input.

Eighty players – eight goaltenders, 24 defencemen and 48 forwards – will take the ice at Joshua’s Creek Arenas in Oakville, Ontario as part of Canada’s national under-17 development camp, set to take place July 18-24. All 80 players have been drafted by Canadian Hockey League teams (39 from the OHL, 23 from the WHL and 18 from the QMJHL), while 17 represented Canada at the 2024 Winter Youth Olympic Games (Beites, Chartrand, Croskery, Di Iorio, Edwards, Ellsworth, Esler, Lawrence, Lin, O’Donnell, Preston, Liam Ruck, Markus Ruck, Rudolph, Valentini, Verhoeff, Wassilyn).

The player selection process was led by Bonora, with assistance from regional scouts Pierre Cholette (Quebec), Rob Simpson (Ontario), Darren Sutherland (Atlantic) and Darrell Woodley (Ontario), as well as Member representatives. Players will continue to be evaluated through the beginning of the 2024-25 season in preparation for the 2024 U17 World Challenge, scheduled for Nov. 1-9 in Sarnia, Ontario.

For more information on Hockey Canada and the Program of Excellence, please visit HockeyCanada.ca or follow through social media on FacebookX and Instagram.

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Coaching staffs named for 2024 Hlinka Gretzky Cup and 2024 U17 World Challenge

Kris Mallette to lead Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team; Travis Crickard and Mathieu Turcotte behind the bench with U17 teams

NR.046.24
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July 12, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta Hockey Canada has named the coaching and support staffs that will lead Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team in defence of its gold medal at the 2024 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, as well as the coaches who will be behind the bench with Canada’s national under-17 teams at the 2024 U17 World Challenge.

After helping lead Canada to back-to-back gold medals as an assistant coach at the Hlinka Gretzky Cup, Kris Mallette (Kelowna, BC/Kelowna, WHL) returns to Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team for the third-consecutive year, this time serving as head coach.

Mallette will be joined on the bench by assistant coaches Gordie Dwyer (Dalhousie, NB/Acadie-Bathurst, LMJHQ) and Ryan Oulahen (Newmarket, ON/North Bay, OHL), along with goaltending consultant Dan De Palma (Kamloops, BC/Kamloops, WHL) and video coach Ethan O’Rourke (Bowmanville, ON/Kingston, OHL).

“We are excited to unveil the coaching and support staffs that will lead our National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team as we look to defend our gold medal at the Hlinka Gretzky Cup,” said Benoit Roy (Sudbury, ON), senior manager of hockey operations. “Kris, Gordie, Ryan, Dan and Ethan bring extensive experience both at the international and Canadian Hockey League levels, and they will be great leaders for this talented group of young men who will compete for Canada in Edmonton next month.”

Mallette has served as head coach of the Kelowna Rockets of the Western Hockey League (WHL) for the past five seasons (2019-24) after six seasons (2013-19) as an assistant, winning a WHL championship and helping the Rockets reach the Memorial Cup final in 2015. Internationally, in addition to his two Hlinka Gretzky Cup gold medals, he also won silver as head coach of Canada Red at the 2021 Capital City Challenge.

Dwyer has served as the head coach and general manager of the Acadie-Bathurst Titan of the Quebec Maritimes Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) since 2022, prior to which he was the head coach of the QMJHL’s Saint John Sea Dogs in 2021-22 and Shawinigan Cataractes in 2019-20. Dwyer won a gold medal as an assistant coach with Canada’s National Men’s Under-18 Team at the 2021 IIHF U18 World Championship. He also served as Canada’s head coach at the 2020 Winter Youth Olympic Games winning a bronze medal, along with a bronze medal as an assistant coach at the 2012 IIHF U18 World Championship.

Oulahen just completed his sixth season as head coach of the North Bay Battalion of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL). Prior to that, he spent three seasons as head coach of the OHL’s Flint Firebirds and six seasons as an assistant coach with the Battalion (2010-16). Oulahen was also behind the bench at the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge in 2014 (assistant coach, Canada Red), 2015 (assistant coach, Canada Black) and 2016 (head coach, Canada White), and was an assistant at the 2019 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, winning silver.

For a full list of staff for Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team, please click here.

The roster for Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team selection camp will be announced at a later date.

Canada will open the preliminary round at the 2024 Hlinka Gretzky Cup against Switzerland on Aug. 5 at 7:30 p.m. MT/9:30 p.m. ET. It will also take on Slovakia and Sweden on Aug. 6 and Aug. 7, respectively, before the tournament concludes with the medal games on Aug. 10.

On the under-17 side, Travis Crickard (St. John’s, NL/Saint John, QMJHL) and Mathieu Turcotte (Kirkland, QC/Blainville-Boisbriand, QMJHL) will be behind the benches of Team Canada Red and Team Canada Black, respectively.

Joining Crickard behind the Canada Red bench are assistant coaches Matt Anholt (Prince Albert, SK/Lethbridge, WHL) and Wes Wolfe (Niagara Falls, ON/Erie, OHL).

Turcotte will have assistant coaches Brad MacKenzie (Charlottetown, PE/Halifax, QMJHL) and Ryan McDonald (Prince Albert, SK/Prince Albert, WHL) behind the Team Canada Black bench. 

“Under-17 is the first step in Hockey Canada’s Program of Excellence, and we are excited to welcome some of the best coaches from the Canadian Hockey League to introduce the country’s top young players to our program,” said Roy. “Each of these coaches brings experience to international, short-term competition and we are eager to continue our preparations leading into November.”

Crickard recently finished his second season as head coach of the QMJHL’s Saint John Sea Dogs following one season as an assistant. He won a gold medal as an assistant coach with Canada’s National Men’s Under-18 Team at the 2024 IIHF U18 World Championship and as video coach at the same tournament in 2021. Crickard was an assistant coach for Canada’s men’s hockey team at the 2024 Winter Youth Olympic Games, finishing fourth, and was video coach (2016) and assistant coach (2017) with Canada Black at the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, winning a silver medal in 2016.

Turcotte just wrapped up his first season as head coach of the QMJHL’s Blainville-Boisbriand Armada. Prior to joining the Armada, he served as head coach of the Blizzard du Séminaire Saint-François of the Ligue de hockey M18 AAA du Québec, winning gold at the 2023 Men’s U18 National Club Championship. He also spent three seasons as an assistant coach with the QMJHL’s Drummondville Voltigeurs (2019-22), six seasons with the LHM18AAAQ’s Chevaliers de Lévis as assistant coach (2008-10) and GM/head coach (2015-19), and stints as an assistant coach with the QMJHL’s Val-d’Or Foreurs (2010-12) and Chicoutimi Saguenéens (2012-14).

Anholt was named associate coach of the WHL’s Lethbridge Hurricanes in June. He has spent six seasons with the hockey club holding roles as skills and development coach before being named an assistant coach in 2020. Ahead of the 2021-22 season, Anholt added assistant general manager to his title, working alongside his father, Lethbridge GM Peter Anholt. He was also an assistant coach with Canada Red at the 2023 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge.

MacKenzie recently completed his third season as an assistant coach with the QMJHL’s Halifax Mooseheads and was promoted to associate coach in June. Prior to joining the Mooseheads, he was head coach of the Grand River Rapids of the Maritime Hockey League (2019-21), earning MHL coach of the year honours in 2020-21.

McDonald recently completed his third full season as an assistant coach with the WHL’s Prince Albert Raiders. He won a silver medal as an assistant coach with Team Saskatchewan at the 2023 Canada Winter Games, and also spent four seasons with the Warman Wildcats AAA program at both the U15 and U18 level. McDonald played five seasons in the WHL with the Regina Pats and Prince Albert followed by a four-year U SPORTS career at Lakehead University and the University of Saskatchewan.

Wolfe recently completed his second season of his second stint as an assistant coach OHL’s Erie Otters. He spent the 2021-22 season as general manager and head coach of the Cobourg Cougars of the Ontario Junior Hockey League following five seasons (2016-21) as an assistant coach with Erie, helping the team win the J. Ross Robertson Cup as OHL champions in his first season.

For a list of staff for Canada’s national under-17 teams, please click here.

The roster for Canada’s national under-17 development camp will be announced at a later date.

For more information on Hockey Canada, Canada’s national Men’s Summer Under-18 Team or Canada’s national under-17 program, please visit HockeyCanada.ca or follow through social media on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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Rivalry Series schedule announced for 2024-25 season

Five-game series includes Canadian stops in Halifax and Summerside

NR.043.24
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July 09, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada, in partnership with USA Hockey, has announced the return of the Rivalry Series between Canada’s National Women’s Team and the United States for the 2024-25 season, featuring two stops in Atlantic Canada.

The 2024-25 Rivalry Series will feature five games, with Canada set to play host in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island in February. The first Canadian stop will see the cross-border rivals face off at Scotiabank Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia, home of the Halifax Mooseheads of the Quebec Maritimes Junior Hockey League (QMJHL), on Thursday, Feb. 6 at 7 p.m. AT. The teams will then travel to Summerside, P.E.I., to play at Credit Union Place, home of the Summerside Western Capitals of the Maritime Hockey League (MHL), on Saturday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. AT.

“We are excited to renew our partnership with USA Hockey to deliver the Rivalry Series, and to provide the best Canadian and American players an opportunity to showcase women’s hockey with games in Halifax and Summerside,” said Hockey Canada president and chief executive officer Katherine Henderson (Thunder Bay, ON). “The series has been a must-see event for hockey fans across Canada since 2018, and it has been instrumental in helping to grow the girls’ and women’s game across North America. We look forward to once again treating fans to five great hockey games and leaving a lasting impact and legacy in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island this season.”

“Halifax and Summerside have proven to be successful international hockey hosts, and we know both communities will embrace the opportunity to welcome and cheer on the best players from Canada and the United States as they compete in the Rivalry Series in February 2025,” said D’Arcy Hutcheson (Barrie, ON), director of events with Hockey Canada. “The Rivalry Series has become a fan-favourite event on the international hockey calendar, and the teams will enjoy facing off in front of passionate hockey fans in two great Canadian communities.”

Tickets for the games in Halifax and Summerside will be available for purchase at HockeyCanada.ca/Tickets at a later date.

Hockey Canada and its Members will announce grassroots initiatives that will take place leading up to the Rivalry Series games in both Canadian stops in the coming months, ensuring the next generation of the game can engage with Canada’s National Women’s Team.

“The Rivalry Series is a great event for players and fans alike, and I know the impact an event like this can have on young players in communities across the country. I am excited that hockey fans in the Maritimes will have the opportunity to take in two games and cheer on Team Canada next season,” said Team Canada forward Blayre Turnbull (Stellarton, NS/Toronto, PWHL). “Fans on the East Coast always embrace the opportunity to watch Canada compete and we know the atmosphere will be incredible, and it will be even more special for me to have a chance to play in my home province and two incredible communities that are close to my hometown.”

The series will kick off with a trio of games in the United States in November, with the teams opening the series at the Tech CU Arena in San Jose, California, on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. PT. The American portion of the Rivalry Series will also include stops at the Maverik Center in West Valley City, Utah, on Friday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. PT and Idaho Central Arena in Boise, Idaho, on Sunday, Nov. 10 at 5 p.m. MT.

TSN and RDS, the official broadcast partners of Hockey Canada, will broadcast all five Rivalry Series games; please check local listings for details.

Last year, the Rivalry Series ended in thrilling fashion for a second-straight year, with Canada’s National Women’s Team winning four-straight games to win the best-of-seven series in seven games. The Canadian games welcomed an average attendance of more than 6,200 fans per game in Kitchener, Sarnia, Saskatoon and Regina, including sell-outs in Kitchener, Sarnia and Regina. Ottawa, Kingston, Kelowna and Trois-Rivières also hosted Rivalry Series games over the past two seasons that featured sold-out crowds.

For more information on Hockey Canada and Canada’s National Women’s Team, please visit HockeyCanada.ca, or follow along via social media on Facebook , X and Instagram .

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Shakita Jensen.

Giving back through coaching

Guided by influential coaches during her playing days, Shakita Jensen knew she wanted to give back to the game she loved by becoming a coach in her hometown

Shannon Coulter
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July 04, 2024

It was a full circle moment for Shakita Jensen when she stepped on the bench as head coach of Team Northwest Territories at the 2024 Arctic Winter Games.

In 2014, she played in the tournament in Alaska. A decade later, she returned to Alaska to coach.

“I felt a lot of emotions,” says Jensen, the national BFL CANADA Women in Coaching Award winner in the Competitive category.

Jensen, from the Tahltan First Nation, started as an on-ice volunteer with the Yellowknife Minor Hockey Association in 2014. Since then, her passion for giving back has driven her to continue her coaching journey.

“The hockey community has given me so much that I felt an obligation to want to give back to the hockey community in any way I could,” Jensen says. “When I got back from school, I was like, ‘I should probably try coaching, see if I like it.’ And of course I liked it right away.”

In addition to giving back, a few impactful women who coached Jensen growing up opened her eyes to her own potential journey.

“Having my first female head coach was super cool, and that made me want to get into coaching,” she says. “Growing up, being sometimes the only girl on my hockey teams, not really many women coaching, and then having my first few female coaches thinking, ‘Wow they’re so cool, I want to be like them one day.’”

The position of being a role model and a leader for youth in her community was also a driving factor in wanting to become a coach.

“I’ve had so many influential coaches in my own playing career. [There are] everlasting impacts they can have on their players, not only on the ice, but off the ice as people as well, what you can teach your players as a coach. I felt that I had lots to offer [as a head coach] and I wanted to be there for kids.”

Shakita Jensen coaching Team NWT at a One For All practice.

 Jensen was in the right place at the right time to get her first head coaching position. There was a shortage of coaches in her association, so they asked Jensen—who initially applied to be an on-ice helper—if she wanted to be a head coach.

“It was a lot of quick learning and kind of being thrown into it, but I felt confident in myself the whole time,” the 26-year-old explains. “I just tried to network with past coaches as much as I could to have a successful season, which I think I did.”

Early in her career, Jensen decided to apply to be a part of the 2023 Canada Winter Games coaching staff for Team NWT, but she wasn’t selected. However, one of the coaches recommended she apply for the Aboriginal Apprentice Coach program with the Aboriginal Sports Circle.

“They chose one woman and one man from the territory, and it could be from any sport, so I knew that it was a bit of a long shot, but when I heard I got in for hockey, I was super excited.”

Through the apprenticeship program, Jensen was able to attend last year’s Canada Winter Games on Prince Edward Island and work with Team NWT leading up to the event. Afterwards, she became an assistant coach for Team NWT for the 2023 Arctic Winter Games before being promoted to head coach for the 2024 tournament.

“I think that definitely opened a lot of doors,” she says. “It was cool to see the progression and to allow me to gain all the tools and resources that I needed to prepare my team.”

As head coach of Team NWT, the location of each player’s hometowns can often be difficult to navigate—sometimes resulting in very few full team practices before an event.

“It was definitely a challenge wanting to build your team culture and work on your strategies and trying to prepare for a high-performance, short-term competition when your team is scattered all over the territories, in some places that are fly in/fly out or just a lot of money barriers,” she explains. “I think one thing that was super helpful was our ability to connect online leading up to the Games.”

Another huge opportunity for Jensen’s team this year was February’s One For All event in Yellowknife. With more than 300 participants over four days, the event celebrated women’s and girls’ hockey with Try Hockey events, on-ice skills, coaching clinics and more.

Team Northwest Territories and Team Nunavut gathered to practice and face off in an exhibition game.

“It was an overwhelming successful weekend—players putting on their hockey gear for the first time and then other players who were about to be graduating minor hockey,” says Jensen, who volunteered with the event. “It felt super to contribute to that program, give back and hopefully keep that program on a yearly basis here.”

When Jensen found out she was the BFL CANADA Women in Coaching Award winner for Hockey North in the Competitive category, she was shocked.

“I was so surprised, kind of caught off guard. I felt so much pride and gratitude.”

Jensen was unsure if she would be able to compete with the great provincial and territorial candidates across the country. But when she saw Cassie Campbell-Pascall on a video call congratulating her for winning the national award, she was in disbelief all over again.

“There are really no words,” she says of winning the national award. “There are so many influential coaches who go unrecognized sometimes for all the work they do. [I’m] really feeling proud of myself, but also feeling proud of everyone else across Canada who’s doing so much for the women’s game.”

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Dave Cameron, Sylvain Favreau, Mike Johnston, Chris Lazary and Justin Pogge.

National Junior Team staff named for 2025 IIHF World Junior Championship

Dave Cameron to serve as head coach; Sylvain Favreau, Mike Johnston, Chris Lazary named assistants

NR.042.24
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July 04, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada has announced the coaching and support staffs that will lead Canada’s National Junior Team in its attempt to reclaim gold on home ice at the 2025 IIHF World Junior Championship in Ottawa, Ontario.

Dave Cameron (Kinkora, PE/Ottawa, OHL) returns to take the reins as head coach after leading Canada to a gold medal at the 2022 IIHF World Junior Championship. He will be joined by assistant coaches Sylvain Favreau (Orleans, ON/Drummondville, QMJHL), Mike Johnston (Dartmouth, NS/Portland, WHL) and Chris Lazary (Toronto, ON/Saginaw, OHL), as well as goaltending consultant Justin Pogge (Penticton, BC) and video coach James Emery (Calgary, AB).

In addition, Peter Anholt (Naicam, SK/Lethbridge, WHL) will return as the U20 lead for the Program of Excellence management group, serving alongside three-time Stanley Cup champion and Olympic gold medallist Brent Seabrook (Tsawwassen, BC), who returns to the National Junior Team for the second-straight year. Anholt and Seabrook helped select the staff alongside Scott Salmond (Creston, BC), senior vice-president of high performance and hockey operations, and Benoit Roy (Sudbury, ON), senior manager of hockey operations.

“Dave has won two gold medals at the World Juniors and has proven to be an excellent leader of Canada’s National Junior Team, and we are excited to have him return to coach our team as we look to reclaim gold in the nation’s capital this year. We are also fortunate to round out our coaching staff with Sylvain, Mike, Chris, Justin and James, as all seven will benefit our team with their extensive CHL and international experience,” Salmond said. “We are also fortunate to work with Peter and Brent again, as they have helped assemble a world-class staff and will be key factors in building a highly skilled team that fans in Ottawa and across the country will be proud to cheer for this holiday season.”

Cameron has served as head coach of the Ottawa 67’s of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) for the past three seasons (2021-24), leading the team to three-straight playoff appearances and winning OHL and Canadian Hockey League (CHL) Coach of the Year awards in 2022-23. He previously spent two seasons as an assistant coach with the Calgary Flames (2016-18) and five seasons with the Ottawa Senators (2011-16) as head coach and assistant, and was the head coach and GM of the OHL’s Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds (1997-99) and Toronto St. Michael’s Majors (2000-04, 2009-10). Cameron was also an assistant with the St. John’s Maple Leafs (1999-2000) and head coach of the Binghamton Senators (2004-07) of the American Hockey League (AHL). Internationally, he has won four medals at the IIHF World Junior Championship, including silver and gold as head coach in 2011 and 2022, respectively, and gold and silver as an assistant in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Cameron also won gold medals as an assistant coach at the 2016 IIHF World Championship and as head coach at the 2004 Junior World Cup.

Favreau recently completed his first season as head coach of the Drummondville Voltigeurs of the Quebec Maritimes Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) after six seasons as head coach (2021-23) and assistant coach (2017-21) with the QMJHL’s Halifax Mooseheads. This season, he led the Voltigeurs to a QMJHL championship and a spot at the Memorial Cup after finishing the regular season atop the Western Conference. Prior to making the jump to the QMJHL, he served as both an assistant (2009-11) and head coach (2011-15) of the Gloucester Rangers of the Central Canada Hockey League (CCHL), and was head coach and director of hockey operations for the CCHL’s Cumberland Grads for two seasons (2015-17). Favreau won a gold medal as an assistant coach with Canada’s National Men’s Summer Under-18 Team at the 2023 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, and was an assistant with Canada Black and head coach of Canada White at the 2018 and 2019 U17 World Challenge, respectively.

Johnston has been senior vice-president, general manager and head coach of the Portland Winterhawks of the Western Hockey League (WHL) for 13 seasons (2009-14, 2016-24), winning the U.S. Division Executive of the Year and Coach of the Year awards this season. He also became the 11th head coach in WHL history to win 500 games, and has led the Winterhawks to seven-consecutive 40-win seasons. Johnston has also served as an assistant (1999-2003) and associate coach (2003-04) with the Vancouver Canucks, an associate with the Los Angeles Kings (2005-08) and head coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins (2014-16). He also coached Canada’s National Men’s Team from 1994-99, winning two gold medals (1997, 2007), two silver (1996, 2008) and one bronze (1995) at the IIHF World Championship. Johnston also won gold at three IIHF World Junior Championships (1994, 1995, 1996) as an assistant coach, was an assistant at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games and head coach at the 2009 IIHF World U18 Championship, and won the Spengler Cup in 1993.

Lazary has served as head coach of the OHL’s Saginaw Spirit for the past five seasons (2018-24) after parts of three seasons (2016-18) as an associate coach with Saginaw and two seasons (2014-16) as an assistant with the OHL’s Sarnia Sting. He led the Spirit to a Memorial Cup championship as the host team this season, as well as back-to-back West Division titles (2018-19, 2019-20). Prior to his CHL coaching career, he spent two seasons (2010-12) as an assistant coach with the St. Michael’s Buzzers of the Ontario Junior Hockey League (OJHL) and one season (2012-13) as an assistant with York University. Lazary was also named head coach of Canada Red for the 2020 U17 World Challenge, which was cancelled due to COVID-19.

The support staff that will work with Canada’s National Junior Team at the 2025 IIHF World Junior Championship includes:

  • Athletic therapists Kevin Elliott (Charlottetown, PE) and Andy Brown (Owen Sound, ON/Owen Sound, OHL)
  • Team physician Dr. R.J. MacKenzie (Albert Bridge, NS/Cape Breton, QMJHL)
  • Equipment managers Chris Cook (Ottawa, ON/Brantford, OHL) and Clayton Johns (Toronto, ON/Portland, WHL)
  • Strength and conditioning coach Sean Young (Ennismore, ON/Ottawa, OHL)
  • Mental performance consultant Luke Madill (Kirkland, QC)
  • Senior coordinator of hockey operations Jacob Grison (Lion’s Head, ON)
  • Media relations manager Spencer Sharkey (Hamilton, ON)
  • Coordinator of hockey operations Cassidy Wait (North Vancouver, BC) – camp staff
  • Hockey operations student Jared Power (Calgary, AB) – camp staff

“The coaching and support staffs that will lead Canada’s National Junior Team is second to none, and we know this group will do everything it can to help our team be successful in Ottawa in December and January,” Anholt said. “I know all members of our staffs are grateful for the opportunity to be a part of such a special event in Canada, and we look forward to building a roster that wears the Maple Leaf with pride on and off the ice as Canadians across the country cheer us on.”

Canada’s National Junior Team will gather at the WFCU Centre in Windsor, Ontario, for a four-day training camp, July 28-31, which includes practices, a Red-White game on July 30 at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT and a game against Sweden on July 31 at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT. Tickets for the games in Windsor can be purchased at HockeyCanada.ca/Tickets starting July 5, and are available for $30 plus fees per game or $45 plus fees for a two-game package. 

The team will also travel to Plymouth, Michigan, to participate in the World Junior Summer Showcase, Aug. 1-3; it will take on Finland on Aug. 2 at 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT and the United States on Aug. 3 at 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT.

For more information on Hockey Canada, Canada’s National Junior Team and the 2025 IIHF World Junior Championship, please visit HockeyCanada.ca, or follow along via social media on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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Sidney Crosby, Brad Marchand, Brayden Point, Connor McDavid, Nathan MacKinnon and Cale Makar surrounding the 4 Nations Face-Off logo with Canada written below.

First six players unveiled for 4 Nations Face-Off

Crosby, MacKinnon, Makar, Marchand, McDavid, Point named to Canada for international event

NR.041.24
|
June 28, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada, in partnership with the National Hockey League (NHL) and National Hockey League Players’ Association (NHLPA), has announced the first six players who will wear the Maple Leaf at the 4 Nations Face-Off, Feb. 12-20, 2025, in Montréal, Québec, and Boston, Massachusetts.

The initial roster includes Sidney Crosby (Cole Harbour, NS/Pittsburgh, NHL), Nathan MacKinnon (Cole Harbour, NS/Colorado, NHL), Cale Makar (Calgary, AB/Colorado, NHL), Brad Marchand (Hammonds Plains, NS/Boston, NHL), Connor McDavid (Newmarket, ON/Edmonton, NHL) and Brayden Point (Calgary, AB/Tampa Bay, NHL), and was selected by general manager Don Sweeney (St. Stephen, NB/Boston, NHL) and associate general manager Jim Nill (Hanna, AB/Dallas, NHL). Head coach Jon Cooper (Prince George, BC/Tampa Bay, NHL) and Scott Salmond (Creston, BC), senior vice-president of high performance and hockey operations, also provided input.

The initial list includes three former first-overall picks in the NHL Draft (Crosby, MacKinnon, McDavid), while all six players have suited up for Canada’s National Junior Team at the IIHF World Junior Championship and five have played for Canada’s National Men’s Team at the IIHF World Championship (Crosby, MacKinnon, Marchand, McDavid, Point). The six players have won a combined eight Stanley Cups, as well as two gold medals at the Olympic Winter Games, six gold at the IIHF World Junior Championship, four gold and two silver at the IIHF World Championship, and gold and bronze at the IIHF U18 World Championship.

“We are excited to announce the first six players who will represent Canada at the 4 Nations Face-Off in February, as these are six world-class players and leaders on their NHL teams that we can build a strong and successful team around,” Sweeney said. “Sidney, Nathan, Cale, Brad, Connor and Brayden have been successful at various levels of their professional and international careers, and we look forward to all six being key contributors to our team as we look to win on the international stage next season.”

Crosby has played in 1,272 games over 19 seasons (2005-24) with the Pittsburgh Penguins, serving as captain for 17 seasons and amassing 1,596 career points (592 goals, 1,004 assists). He has also collected 201 points (71 goals, 130 assists) in 180 playoff games, helping the Penguins win the Stanley Cup three times (2009, 2016, 2017). Over the course of his career, Crosby has won the Ted Lindsay Award three times, the Hart Trophy, Art Ross Trophy, Maurice “Rocket” Richard Trophy and Conn Smythe Trophy twice, as well as the Mark Messier Leadership Award. Internationally, he won back-to-back gold medals at the Olympic Winter Games, as well as gold and silver at the IIHF World Junior Championship. He also won gold at the IIHF World Championship, becoming a member of the IIHF’s Triple Gold Club – the first to win all three as captain - and won the World Cup of Hockey.

MacKinnon recently completed his 11th season (2013-24) with the Colorado Avalanche, where he has served as an alternate captain for the past eight years. He has played in 791 career games, registering 899 points (335 goals, 564 assists), and has contributed 114 points (48 goals, 66 assists) in 88 career playoff games. He helped the Avalanche win the Stanley Cup in 2022, and has won the Calder Trophy, Lady Byng Trophy, Hart Trophy and Ted Lindsay Award. MacKinnon has worn the Maple Leaf five times, winning a gold and silver medal at the IIHF World Championship, and gold at the Ivan Hlinka Memorial Cup. He also suited up at the IIHF World Junior Championship and played for Team North America at the World Cup of Hockey.

Makar has suited up in 315 career games over five seasons (2019-24) with the Colorado Avalanche, registering 336 points (86 goals, 250 assists). He has also appeared in 72 career playoff games, collecting 80 points (21 goals, 59 assists), earning the Conn Smythe Trophy while helping Colorado win the Stanley Cup in 2022. Makar has also won the Calder Trophy and Norris Trophy, as well as the Hobey Baker Award as the top player in NCAA men’s hockey. Internationally, he won a gold medal at the IIHF World Junior Championship, and suited up for Canada West at the World Junior A Challenge twice, winning one gold medal.

Marchand has spent 15 seasons (2009-24) with the Boston Bruins, serving his first season as captain in 2023-24 after five years as an alternate captain. He has amassed 929 career points (401 goals, 528 assists) in 1,029 games, as well as 138 points (56 goals, 82 assists) in 157 playoff games, and won the Stanley Cup in 2011. On the international stage, Marchand won back-to-back gold medals at the IIHF World Junior Championship, a gold medal at the IIHF World Championship and the World Cup of Hockey.

McDavid recently completed his ninth season (2015-24) with the Edmonton Oilers, leading the Oilers to the Stanley Cup Final and winning the Conn Smythe Trophy in his eighth season as captain. In 645 career games, he has registered 982 points (335 goals, 647 assists), and has added 117 points (37 goals, 80 assists) in 74 playoff games. McDavid has registered 100 or more points in seven different seasons, helping him win the Art Ross Trophy five times, the Ted Lindsay Award four times, the Hart Trophy three times and the Maurice “Rocket” Richard Trophy once. He has suited up for Canada five times, winning gold at the IIHF U18 World Championship, IIHF World Junior Championship and IIHF World Championship. McDavid also played for Team North America at the World Cup of Hockey.

Point has played for the Tampa Bay Lightning for his entire eight-year NHL career (2016-24), collecting 553 points (264 goals, 289 assists) in 580 career games, as well as 87 points (42 goals, 45 assists) in 87 playoff games. He scored 14 goals in the playoffs in two-consecutive seasons to help the Lightning win back-to-back Stanley Cups (2020, 2021). Internationally, Point has won silver at the IIHF World Championship, gold at the IIHF World Junior Championship, gold at the Ivan Hlinka Memorial Cup and bronze at the IIHF U18 World Championship.

The full roster will be announced between Nov. 29-Dec. 2, while the coaching and support staffs will be announced in the coming months. 

Canada will open the 4 Nations Face-Off against Sweden on Feb. 12, 2025, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT at the Bell Centre in Montréal. It will also take on the United States on Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT in Montréal and Finland on Feb. 17 at 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT at TD Garden in Boston before the tournament concludes with the championship on Feb. 20 at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT in Boston. 

For more information on the 4 Nations Face-Off, please visit the official tournament page.

For more information on Hockey Canada and Canada’s National Men’s Team, please visit HockeyCanada.ca, or follow along through social media on FacebookX and Instagram.

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Jon Cooper.
© Tampa Bay Lightning/Mark Lomoglio

Jon Cooper named head coach for 2025 4 Nations Face-Off and 2026 Olympic Winter Games

Tampa Bay Lightning head coach returns to Team Canada for first time since 2017

NR.040.24
|
June 25, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada has announced that veteran National Hockey League (NHL) head coach Jon Cooper (Prince George, BC/Tampa Bay, NHL) will lead Canada at the 2025 4 Nations Face-Off and 2026 Olympic Winter Games in Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy.

The Tampa Bay Lightning bench boss and longest-tenured active head coach in the NHL will make his return to the Team Canada bench for the first time since 2017, when he led Canada’s National Men’s Team to a silver medal at the 2017 IIHF World Championship.

Cooper was selected by Doug Armstrong (Sarnia, ON/St. Louis, NHL), management group lead for Canada’s National Men’s Team and general manager for the 2026 Olympics, as well as Don Sweeney (St. Stephen, NB/Boston, NHL) and Jim Nill (Hanna, AB/Dallas, NHL), who make up the management group for the 2025 4 Nations Face-Off and 2026 Olympics. Player relations advisor Ryan Getzlaf (Regina, SK/Anaheim, NHL) and Scott Salmond (Creston, BC), senior vice-president of high performance and hockey operations, along with Katherine Henderson (Thunder Bay, ON), Hockey Canada’s president and chief executive officer, and Pat McLaughlin (Saint John, NB), chief operating officer and executive vice-president of strategy, also provided input as part of the executive committee preparing for the 2026 Olympics.

 “Jon is a world-class person, coach and leader, and his impressive resume and success in the NHL make him the perfect person to lead Team Canada over the next two years at the 4 Nations Face-Off and 2026 Olympic Winter Games,” Armstrong said. “Our management group knows that Jon will represent our country with pride while bringing his winning pedigree to the international stage, and we look forward to working with him as we build teams with the best NHL players in Canada at two marquee events.”

Cooper recently completed his 12th season as head coach of the Lightning, and is the franchise’s all-time leader in regular season games coached (879), regular season wins (480), playoff games coached (139) and playoff wins (84). During his time with the Lightning, he has led the team to 10 playoff appearances, one Presidents’ Trophy (2018-19) and four Stanley Cup Finals (2015, 2020, 2021, 2022), winning back-to-back Stanley Cups in 2020 and 2021. Prior to joining Tampa Bay, he spent two seasons (2010-12) with the Norfolk Admirals of the American Hockey League (AHL), winning the Calder Cup and AHL Coach of the Year Award in 2011-12, and part of one season with the AHL’s Syracuse Crunch. Internationally, in addition to his silver medal in 2017, he served as an assistant coach with Team North America at the 2016 World Cup of Hockey. He was also announced as head coach of Canada’s Men’s Olympic Team for the 2022 Olympics if NHL players participated.

The first six players for the 4 Nations Face-Off are expected to be announced in late June, while additional announcements regarding Canada’s Men’s Olympic Team will be made at a later date.

The 4 Nations Face-Off is a new international event that will feature NHL players from Canada, Finland, Sweden and the United States. The seven-game event will take place Feb. 12-20 at the Bell Centre in Montréal, Québec, home of the Montréal Canadiens, and TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts, home of the Boston Bruins.

For more information on Hockey Canada, Canada’s National Men’s Team and Canada’s Men’s Olympic Team, please visit HockeyCanada.ca, or follow along via social media on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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Emerance Maschmeyer

In My Own Words: Emerance Maschmeyer

The National Women’s Team goaltender talks about life with partner Geneviève Lacasse, starting a family, being a trailblazer in the PWHL and the importance of being one’s true self

Emerance Maschmeyer
|
June 15, 2024

A few of our friends described it as a “hard launch.”

Geneviève and I decided not to officially “come out,” but instead we decided to just post the photos from our wedding last July. At that point, our friends, our families, our circle – the people who meant the most – all knew about our relationship.

We wondered if we needed to have a big coming out story. But we thought posting the photos of the day was a fun way of saying, “This is us. We got married,” like anyone else would post about getting married. It was time for us to just put ourselves out there and not be scared. There was so much love and support, and it was just so inspiring to see the effect we were able to have, just posting about our relationship.

We have a platform and influence, and we have people who follow our journeys. At the end of the day, those who support us will support us, and we want them in our lives, and we want to connect with them, but those who don’t, that’s all right.

We knew the impact we could have sharing our relationship and sharing our story; we knew there would be a positive impact, and we could help so many other individuals with their journey. And so maybe with age, there was some courage in telling our story, but we have all the support we need. So, for us, it was – how do we help others and support others now?

Going public was a huge weight lifted off our shoulders that neither of us recognized was there. And now I feel like we’re very open to having conversations, talking about our relationship and being our true selves. It’s been a rewarding journey. It was only a year ago, and it’s been so fun to just be out there and be us as a couple.

Geneviève and I started dating in 2015. I told my sister pretty early on about our relationship. Geneviève was the first woman that I ever dated. So, I also wanted to make sure that it was something, a longstanding relationship, before I told my entire family, which I would’ve done in any relationship that I was in.

I was in school at Harvard at the time, and so my teammates and friends at school knew early as well. And I knew I wanted to tell my family, but I wanted to do it in person. I didn’t want to make it a big deal, but I also know the norm in society is still, you’re heterosexual until you say otherwise. You have to come out and tell your story. I wanted to make it as normal as possible, but I also wanted to have in-person conversations with my family.

About a year after we started dating, I started telling my family. I told my parents one at a time. I went through my family. And I have a big family, so it was a lot of conversations. Being young, I was 20 years old, I was quite nervous about the conversations, but ultimately my family was so supportive– every conversation left me with ‘my family supports me and loves me no matter who I love.’ I know that’s not the case for everyone, but I am very fortunate to have a family that has my back no matter what. They were just happy I was in a loving relationship.

There were hesitations in coming out publicly, but it didn’t really have anything to do with our sexuality. It had everything to do with the fact that both of us were still active with the National Women’s Team, and we didn’t want our news to be about our relationship or our sexuality. We wanted it to be about hockey and our performance.

It’s certainly not easy when you and your partner share a profession. At the beginning, we had to say to each other that in many ways our relationship comes first, but we also have to put our own hockey first. And not in a selfish way, it’s more like… “If you do everything you can to make a team and to put yourself in a position to play, and I do everything I can to make a team and put myself in a position to play, then it’s not up to us. It’s up to the coach, it’s up to the scouts, it’s up to external factors.”

We were on the journey together, we were working hard and doing everything we could do individually, but when it came down to those decisions, we weren’t angry at each other. We could feel empathy if one played over the other, but at the end of the day, if one of us is in net, then it became, “Okay, I support you or you support me.”

We did have some bumps in the road along the way. I was released from the 2018 Olympics and she made the team. And then vice versa, in 2022, I made the Olympic team and she was released. This presented us with a big learning opportunity in our relationship. The first time around when I was released, we weren’t equipped with the skills to handle it. It was a big dream of mine to make that team and to play in the Olympics. And what do you say to your partner on either end, the one who makes it or the one who doesn’t? Navigating the situation and our dynamic was complex. We were supportive of one another, and to protect our relationship we felt that not talking about hockey was the best course.

The second time around, going into Beijing, we learned how to talk through it. We gained an understanding of how to have difficult conversations, to talk about how we feel. We wish that neither of those situations happened, but they actually made our relationship a lot stronger. We have acquired the skills to support each other and communicate through difficult situations, and recognize the importance of continuously practicing and refining those skills.

We found out we were pregnant in late 2023, a few months after we got married. We’re fortunate that we have friends that have gone through the fertility treatment process that we could use as a resource, and so we asked a lot of questions. We did a lot of research. We were living in Quebec, and luckily there’s funding to make the financial burden easier. Our journey to conception wasn’t long, and for that we are grateful.

It’s been quite a journey. We’re so excited to start our family and welcome our little boy to the world. It’s something that we had been wanting to do for so long, but having us both playing, it wasn’t really a possibility, especially without the salaries and security of a professional league. But now we’re finally in a position where I’m playing in the PWHL and Geneviève has security in her job as manager of corporate sponsorships and sales with the league. It’s the most security and stability we’ve had in a long time, and we’re excited to start our family.

We are looking forward to having our son grow up around strong women. And we know that he’ll grow up to respect women and look at women’s athletes as just athletes.

And I can’t forget the gender reveal! I was sitting on the bus with Emily Clark on a road trip this year, and we were chatting about doing a gender reveal, and just brainstorming some ideas. And then somehow it came up that it would be so fun to have an obstacle course and have the team involved. It evolved into Clark vs. Jenner, boy vs. girl, and went from there.

Geneviève and I gave them the link to the gender, because we wanted to be surprised as well. We set up one day after practice, and Clarky and Jenner, they came up with how the race would go. It turned out so good!

This year has been such a whirlwind. The wedding, the announcement of the PWHL, signing with Ottawa, finding out we were pregnant, launching the league, winning another world championship … hard to believe that’s only the last 11 months.

It’s been so incredible, the momentum that we have in the PWHL, the fandom, the support, the investment and the visibility. And just the growth that we’ve had within just our first season. Being a professional hockey player still feels surreal to me, but the pride I felt every time I stepped onto the ice with my teammates in Ottawa this season … it’s indescribable to be part of something so special.

Obviously, there’s still a long way to go for equity and parity, but we’ve made some huge steps in the past few years. Even in the grassroots now, there’s that ripple effect from the PWHL of getting women in sport and staying in sport.

At our games, I see young fans, not just young girls, but young boys too who just see us as hockey players. They don’t see us as women’s hockey players. They’re looking up to us like, “You’re my favourite player, you’re my favourite goalie.” They’re not saying, “You’re my favourite female goalie.” It’s been fantastic to see the shift in the mindset, and there are so many more stepping stones to come.

Because it is Pride Month, which means so much to me, I did want to end with a few thoughts.

Individually, everyone can look inward and see where they can do the work. I think often, people lead with assumptions when meeting someone. But we can all do a better job at letting them tell their story versus labelling them with, ‘You are this or you are that.’ It can be intimidating to be your true self because of preconceived assumptions.

Unfortunately, there’s going to be hate online. That’s unavoidable in the social media age we live in. But I think as much as we can, we need to hold on to the love and the support, and ensure the kind, loving, supportive voices drown out the negative ones.

As someone who’s in a same-sex relationship, I know that at times I can still be a little timid or discouraged to be my true self, but for those in our community, I encourage you to be as courageous as you can. Be your true self. If you come into a conversation and lead with your authentic self, it will start changing minds slowly. One person at a time.

We are moving in the right direction, and together is how we’re going to keep moving.

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Canada finishes fourth at 2024 IIHF World Championship

National Men’s Team concludes Men’s Worlds with 4-2 loss to Sweden in bronze medal game

NR.036.24
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May 26, 2024

PRAGUE, Czechia – Canada’s National Men’s Team has finished fourth at the 2024 IIHF World Championship after falling 4-2 to Sweden in the bronze medal game at O2 Arena on Sunday.

“Playing for Canada is so special, and regardless of the circumstances, any time you get the call to represent your country and compete for a gold medal is an amazing opportunity,” said captain John Tavares (Oakville, ON/Toronto, NHL). “To wear the [captain’s] ‘C’ and play with this group of guys is something I will be forever grateful for, but obviously it is a disappointing result for us.”

After falling behind 1-0 in the first period on a Carl Grundström goal, Jamie Oleksiak (Toronto, ON/Seattle, NHL) found Dylan Cozens (Whitehorse, YT/Buffalo, NHL), who buried his tournament-leading ninth goal from the slot to even the score.

Canada broke the deadlock just over four minutes into the third period when Pierre-Luc Dubois (Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, QC/Los Angeles, NHL) fired home a one-timer off a Brandon Hagel (Morinville, AB/Tampa Bay, NHL) cross-ice pass. Tavares also registered an assist on the play, moving him into a tie for the tournament lead in assists with nine.

Erik Karlsson and Grundström would give Sweden a 3-2 lead after scoring twice in 4:07 in the third period before Marcus Johansson scored into an empty net.

“The really tough loss was last night because we wanted to be playing for a gold medal today, but we also wanted to win our last game and bring home a bronze medal. Today stings but the semifinal stings a lot too,” Dubois said. “Every time you come [to the world championship], you meet unbelievable people. Some are new and some are players that you have met before, and I had an unbelievable time with this group. After a month together, it is tough to be so close to playing in the gold medal game but losing in a shootout.”

Jordan Binnington (Richmond Hill, ON/St. Louis, NHL) made 29 saves in the loss. A full game summary can be found at HockeyCanada.ca.

“It was a little tough to get our game going today, but I thought we were rock solid in the second period. We could have handled our lead a little better and I feel like we backed off [Sweden] too much, and unfortunately we were not as good as we needed to be,” said head coach André Tourigny (Nicolet, QC/Utah, NHL). “Our players worked hard all tournament, and they were very committed to winning and fought for each other. I have so much respect for all the guys in our room for the sacrifice they made to play in this tournament, and I am really proud of our team.”

Following the semifinals, Cozens, Brandon Tanev (Toronto, ON/Seattle, NHL) and Colton Parayko (St. Albert, AB/St. Louis, NHL) were named Team Canada’s three best players of the tournament.

Canada finished the preliminary round in first place in Group A after wins over Great Britain, Denmark, Austria, Norway, Finland, Switzerland and Czechia. It booked a spot in the semifinals after a 6-3 win over Slovakia before falling to Switzerland 3-2 in a shootout.

Since 1931, Canada has collected 28 gold medals at the IIHF World Championship, to go along with 16 silver and seven bronze.

For more information on Hockey Canada and Canada’s National Men’s Team, please visit HockeyCanada.ca, or follow along via social media on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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Canada vs. Sweden

Men’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Sweden

Sunday, May 26 | 9 a.m. ET | Prague, Czechia | Bronze Medal Game

Jason La Rose
|
May 26, 2024

The 2024 IIHF World Championship comes to a close Sunday as Canada’s National Men’s Team faces off against Sweden for the bronze medal at O2 Arena.

Last Game

Canada saw its quest for back-to-back gold medals halted Saturday in a 3-2 semifinal shootout loss to Switzerland. After the Swiss took a 2-0 first-period lead, the Canadians got goals from Brandon Tanev and John Tavares – with just over two minutes remaining – to force extra time, but came up one short in the shootout.

The Swedes had their perfect run come to an unceremonious end with a 7-3 semifinal loss to host Czechia. Joel Eriksson Ek led the offence with a goal and an assist for the Swedes, who had allowed just 10 goals across eight games prior to Saturday, and outshot the Czechs 40-23.

Last Meeting

An epic comeback highlighted the quarterfinal clash between the Canadians and Swedes in 2022. Trailing 3-0 entering the third period, Canada got goals from Ryan Graves, Pierre-Luc Dubois and Mat Barzal – the last two 30 seconds apart within the final two minutes – before Drake Batherson ended it 43 seconds into overtime for a 4-3 win and a place in the semifinals.

What to Watch

As this edition of Team Canada takes to the ice for the final time, it’s important to note once again the youth movement that answered the call of its country in Czechia. The Canadian roster averages 25 years old, tied with Norway and the United States for the youngest in the tournament. Half – 12 of 24 – were born in 2000 or later, and just five – Binnington, Oleksiak, Power, Tanev and Tavares – are in their 30s. And it’s a decorated group: 25 gold medals at IIHF competitions, including the Olympics, Men’s Worlds, World Juniors and U18 Men’s Worlds. Of those 25, 14 are from the World Juniors, and 11 are within the last five years. The future of Canadian hockey looks bright.

The ageless Erik Karlsson is at it again for the Swedes. The 33-year-old has posted 10 points (5-5—10) in nine games for Sweden, tying him for the team lead with Marcus Johansson (5-5—10) and Andre Burakovsky (4-6—10) and leaving him two points back of Swiss captain Roman Josi for the tournament scoring lead among blue-liners. Karlsson – wearing the ‘C’ for the Swedes – is playing his first IIHF World Championship since 2012. His international trophy case also includes an Olympic silver medal (2014), Men’s Worlds bronze (2010) and World Juniors silver (2009).

A Look Back

No opponent has been a more frequent foe for Canada at the IIHF World Championship than Sweden; Sunday’s game will mark the 69th meeting between the longtime rivals, dating back to a scoreless tie in 1931.

Since the medal round was reintroduced to IIHF tournaments in 1992, it’s the fifth time the Canadians and Swedes will meet for a medal, but just the second for bronze; at the 1992 Men’s Worlds, Brian Savage and Adam Graves scored third-period goals, but Canada dropped a 3-2 decision in Lillehammer, Norway.

All-time record: Canada leads 36-27-5 (3-3 in OT/SO)
Canada goals: 242
Sweden goals: 191

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For more information:

Esther Madziya
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 284-6484 

[email protected] 

Spencer Sharkey
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 777-4567

[email protected]

Jeremy Knight
Manager, Corporate Communications
Hockey Canada

(647) 251-9738

[email protected]

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Schedule
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Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Date: Jul 19 to 23
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Edmonton, Alta., Canada
Date: Aug 3 to 10
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San Jose, CA | Salt Lake City, UT | Boise, ID | Halifax, NS | Summerside, PE
Date: Nov 6 to Feb 8