tim hunter feature
5 Questions with Tim Hunter
The World Juniors bench boss talks about making the move from assistant to head coach, playing in Canada, and making the most of home-ice advantage in B.C.
Jessica Gowans
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July 19, 2018
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Call it a World Juniors hat trick for Tim Hunter, who is back behind the bench with Canada’s National Junior Team for the third year in a row.

After winning silver (2017) and gold (2018) in his first two appearances as an assistant, the former NHLer takes the reins as head coach for the 2019 tournament in Vancouver and Victoria, B.C.

Just over a week away from the start of the Sport Chek World Junior Showcase in Kamloops, B.C., HockeyCanada.ca sat down with the Moose Jaw Warriors head coach to get his thoughts on his promotion, and what to expect on the West Coast.

Q: After two years as an assistant, what changes now that you’re the head coach?

TH: I have to do what was done before me, and that’s let my assistants do their job. Give them direction, give them a role, and let them do their job. On the other side with myself, is trust my instinct and my plan, stay patient with it and stay patient with the players. It starts in the summer in Kamloops, implementing our mindset and the vision we want. My thing for our team this year is to let them write their own story; don’t worry about what’s gone on before them. Yes, relish in the history and the pride in the Canadian jersey and the World Juniors tradition, but write their own story by doing something special as a group.

Q: You never had the opportunity to represent your country as a player, so what does it mean to you to get to do it now as a coach?

TH: At any level, in any capacity, it just an honour and a thrill to represent your country. I knew my time wouldn’t come as a player, and once I got into coaching I was hoping that at some point I’d get an opportunity. I was really fortunate to win a bronze in Switzerland at the U18 world championship [in 2015] and that was my first taste at being involved as a part of Hockey Canada, which is the ultimate team to play for or to coach. I’ve won a Stanley Cup, but it’s really thrilling to put on that Canadian jersey, and to be behind the bench with a bunch of players wearing it. To be the head coach of the U20 program is such an honour, and such a thrill.

Q: The World Juniors are back in Canada this year; what’s different when the tournament is at home?

TH: When it’s on home soil, it’s so special. All the Canadian games are sold out, the crowds are coming into the arena before the games and they’ve all got their jerseys and the flags, it’s so cool. It gives our players such a big boost when they look out and see so much support and so much love from the country following them and cheering them on. I think it’s a huge advantage for us, and for the players; they all want to be in that big spotlight under the bright lights and it’s such a great opportunity for them to display the skill and make Canadians proud.

Q: Is dealing with the pressure of the home crowds and the expectations going to be a focus?

TH: Players at that level don’t really feel the pressure. They want that situation, they want to be in those big games. They want to play in the quarter-finals and they want to win, and they want to get in the semis and want to get a chance to play for gold, and that’s all we ask for. Being in the spotlight and having so much support and so many people cheering for you, it’s not really pressure for them. It’s what they crave, it’s what they want. They want attention, they want that opportunity to win the big game. The players, and even me as a coach, don’t look at it as pressure, it’s an opportunity.

Q: With summer camp in Kamloops, what are the benefits playing international games right away?

TH: To get to it early is great, because the players will see our messaging for the first time, and we’ll see how they react to it and see how it works. We can use that information on how we’re going to prepare a little bit better or add or delete some things come the tournament in December. It’s a nice segue into our systems and our mindset with our players, both introducing ourselves and that mindset to the players, and the players to us. I think it’s a great preliminary opportunity.

For more information:

Lisa Dornan
Director, Communications
Hockey Canada
403-777-4557 / 403-510-7046 (mobile)
ldornan@hockeycanada.ca

 

Esther Madziya
Coordinator, Media Relations
Hockey Canada
403-284-6484
emadziya@hockeycanada.ca

 

Spencer Sharkey
Coordinator, Communications
Hockey Canada
403-777-4567 / 905-906-5327 (mobile)
ssharkey@hockeycanada.ca

 

Katie Macleod
Coordinator, Media Relations
Hockey Canada
403-284-6427 / 403-612-2893 (mobile)
kmacleod@hockeycanada.ca

 

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