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Kristen Campbell
© Finnish Ice Hockey Association, Jari Mäki-Kuutti

Q&A with Kristen Campbell

From attending a Hockey Canada Skills Academy to playing on Canada’s National Women’s Team, Kristen Campbell reflects on how Shaftesbury High helped her achieve her goals

Shannon Coulter
|
November 17, 2021

When she was 16 years old, Kristen Campbell made the big move from her hometown of Brandon, Man., to attend Shaftesbury High School, a Hockey Canada Skills Academy (HCSA) in Winnipeg.

Eight years later, the goaltender is competing for a spot on Canada’s Women’s Olympic Team roster. Campbell took time out from her centralization schedule to talk about her HCSA experience and how she continues to be impacted by her time in the program.

Hockey Canada (HC): Why did you decide to attend an HCSA?

Kristen Campbell (KC): I moved away from home to do it because I knew I would get maximum development there. I was able to practice every single day on the ice with our team and hockey was counting as a credit there too, so it was awesome because my gym class was out on the ice. I had my goals set on playing [NCAA] Division 1 hockey in the [United States] and then also making Team Canada, so that was going to be a step in the right direction… I had some great coaches out there, who had a lot of experience with girls getting into post-secondary, Division 1 schools. So definitely a lot of factors as to why I made the move, but I knew it was going to be crucial in helping my game develop and then ultimately achieving those goals.

HC: How did your experience at a HCSA prepare you for playing in the NCAA and with Team Canada?

KC: There’s a lot of things I learned from it… I think the biggest thing was just time-management skills. We were travelling a lot, but practicing every day on the ice; it was quite a lot, but it just prepared me for college and that lifestyle. I think that being able to incorporate a heavy training schedule at a young age really helped me when I hit the college ranks and then obviously, helped me prepare for my opportunities when I got invited to Team Canada camp as well.

HC: What’s your favourite memory from attending an HCSA?

KC: I would say all the times I got to spend with my team. Not just at the rink, but away from it too… It was just so much fun. Obviously, I was going to school with all the girls and then you’re practicing with them. It’s just the ultimate hockey experience. Before, I wasn’t going to school with the people I played hockey with. So, I think just enjoying every moment, whether it was in a classroom when you’re doing schoolwork or in the locker room, road trips, just everything. It was really great to be able to always be with your team.

HC: Who was a coach or instructor that really made an impact in your life during your time at Shaftesbury?

KC: My goalie coach was Gord Woodhall. He coaches with the [National Women’s Under-18 Team] now. I hadn’t had a full-time goalie coach before, and he was able to come out to all of our practices and always had a plan for me, development-wise. We always had something I was working on that day. He was my psychology teacher too, and my math teacher. He was really great with the psychological side of the game. He really helped me mentally as a goaltender. We still keep in touch regularly… he definitely had a big impact and still continues to keep having a big impact on me.

Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. United States

Sunday, April 14 | 5 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Gold Medal Game

Jason La Rose, Shannon Coulter
|
April 14, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. UNITED STATES (APRIL 14)

Here we go. Canada’s National Women's Team is one win away from a record-extending 13th gold medal at the IIHF Women’s World Championship, taking on the host Americans in the gold medal game Sunday night.

Last Game

Canada took care of business in the semifinals, shutting out Czechia 4-0 to advance to the gold medal game. Laura Stacey set up first-period goals for Blayre Turnbull and Jocelyne Larocque. Emily Clark and Sarah Fillier rounded out the scoring for the Canadians. Ann-Renée Desbiens made nine saves while Canada put 47 shots on Czechia’s Klara Peslarova.

The United States come into the gold medal game undefeated, earning a 5-0 shutout of Finland in the semifinals. University of Wisconsin forward Laila Edwards recorded a hat trick, with Hannah Bilka and Savannah Harmon finding the back of the net as well. Finland’s Sanni Ahola made 50 saves, while Aerin Frankel stopped 15 shots for the semifinal win.

Last Meeting 

The North American rivals played arguably the best game of the preliminary round last Monday, with the Canadians dropping a narrow 1-0 decision in overtime. Ann-Renée Desbiens was absolutely sensational, finishing with 29 saves, but Canada couldn’t solve Frankel. It marked just the third time in 184 all-time meetings that Canada and the U.S. went 60 minutes goalless – the other two were both in Women’s Worlds gold medal games, in 2005 and 2016.

What to Watch 

While names like Poulin, Nurse, Spooner and Fast get the headlines, Jocelyne Larocque continues to just go about her business quietly and effectively. Set to play in her 10th Women’s Worlds gold medal game, the Ste. Anne, Manitoba, product – who cracked list of top-10 oldest players to represent Canada at the tournament (she was 35 years, 10 months, 17 days for the prelim opener) – leads the Canadian contingent in time on ice (22:21 per game) and tops the tournament with a plus/minus of +15. She’s also chipped in with a goal and four assists in six games.

In order for Canada to have success today, they will need to find a way past Frankel. She has had a record-breaking tournament for the United States, allowing only three goals in five games, with a 0.59 goals-against average and a 0.962 saves percentage. With her semifinal shutout, the 24-year-old set the record for the most shutouts at a single Women’s Worlds with four.

A Look Back 

This will be the 22nd time Canada and the U.S. have met for gold at Women’s Worlds, with Canada holding a 12-9 edge in the first 21. Nor surprisingly, these two teams always seem to play a close game with a world title on the line.

Prior to last year’s 6-3 win for the Americans – which was a tie game with less than four minutes to go – seven of the previous eight gold medal games were one-goal contests, and the only outlier, in 2015, was a two-goal game. Those eight games included five that needed overtime – in 2011, 2012, 2016, 2017 and 2021.

All-time record: Canada leads 104-79-1 (23-20 in OT/SO)
Canada goals: 508 
United States goals: 445

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Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Czechia

Saturday, April 13 | 7 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Semifinal

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 12, 2024

Canada’s National Women's Team is into the final four at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, taking on Czechia in a Saturday night semifinal in Utica with a place in the gold medal game on the line.

Last Game

Canada booked its spot in the semifinals after downing Sweden 5-1 in its Thursday quarterfinal. Renata Fast scored twice, opening the scoring in the first period and adding insurance in the second, while Laura Stacey, Natalie Spooner and Jaime Bourbonnais rounded out the scoring for the Canadians. Jocelyne Larocque joined Fast as multi-point scorers, picking up a pair of assists, while Emerance Maschmeyer turned aside 17 of the 18 shots she faced.

Czechia secured its spot in the semifinals thanks to Daniela Pejsova, who got a point shot through traffic for the game’s only goal with 7:06 left to give the Czechs a 1-0 win over Germany. Klara Peslarova stopped all 24 shots the Germans threw her way for her second shutout of the tournament.

Last Meeting 

In preliminary-round play last Sunday, Kristin O’Neill scored two goals and provided an assist, Sarah Nurse contributed with two helpers and Ann-Renée Desbiens made 13 saves for the shutout as Canada blanked the Czechs 5-0.

What to Watch 

While Canada’s goaltending has been the focus, and rightfully so with Desbiens and Maschmeyer combining for a .973 save percentage through five games, let’s turn our attention to the bottom of the Canadian forward group. While the top unit has scored just twice (one of them an empty-netter), the fourth line of O’Neill between Danielle Serdachny and Julia Gosling has been terrific (O’Neill leads Canada in scoring), and the trio of Stacey, Blayre Turnbull and Emily Clark contributed the game-winning goal in the quarterfinals. Don’t sleep on the big guns, though; last year in the semifinals, Sarah Fillier potted a hat trick in a win over Switzerland.

Natálie Mlýnková is tearing it up for the Czechs. The 22-year-old is tied for second in goals with four and tied for second in points with six, and is the top scorer in the tournament not wearing the red, white and blue of the United States. For the trivia buffs, three Czechs — Anezka Cabelova, Tereza Plosova, and Adela Sapovalivova — can make history by winning a medal in Utica; they would join Marie-Philip Poulin (Canada, 2009), Susanna Tapani (Finland, 2011), and Nelli Laitnen and Viivi Vainikka (Finland, 2019) as the only players to win a medal at the IIHF U18 Women's World Championship and IIHF Women's World Championship in the same season.

A Look Back 

History is very, very recent between these two teams. They’ve only met twice – last year in Brampton and last weekend in Utica.

All-time record: Canada leads 2-0-0
Canada goals: 10 
Czechia goals: 1 

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Canada vs. Sweden

Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Sweden

Thursday, April 11 | 5 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Quarterfinal

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 10, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. SWEDEN (APRIL 11)

It’s on to the playoffs for Canada’s National Women's Team as it takes on Sweden in quarterfinal action Thursday at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship.

Last Game

Ann-Renée Desbiens was sensational on Monday night, making 29 saves, but Canada closed out the preliminary round in Utica with a 1-0 overtime loss to the United States to finish second in Group A. Laura Stacey and Natalie Spooner led the Canadian offence with four shots on goal apiece.

Like the Canadians, the Swedes are also coming into the quarters on the heels of a 1-0 defeat. Sweden dropped its final preliminary game against Germany on Monday, despite outshooting the Germans 32-24 —forward Lina Ljungblom had seven of the Swedes’ 32 shots.

Last Meeting 

Canada narrowly avoided the upset in the quarterfinals a year ago at Women’s Worlds in Brampton, escaping with a 3-2 victory thanks to overtime heroics from Sarah Nurse. Nurse scored a pair in that game, while Blayre Turnbull added the other for the Canadians, who finished with a 54-14 advantage in shots but ran up against a red-hot Emma Söderberg in the Swedish goal.

What to Watch 

The obvious storyline here is goaltending. Ann-Renée Desbiens was nothing short of terrific through the preliminary round, fashioning a tournament-leading .974 save percentage and 0.65 goals-against average through three starts, capped by a 29-save clinic against the Americans. And if Canada decides it wants to save Desbiens for the weekend, Emerance Maschmeyer is a heck of a backup; she was perfect in her lone prelim start against Switzerland, stopping all 12 shots she faced in a 3-0 win to post her sixth shutout in 13 all-time appearances at Women’s Worlds.

For the Swedes — Lina Ljungblom, Hilda Svensson, Hanna Olsson and Söderberg. Seventeen-year-old Svensson forced overtime against Canada a year ago, tying the game with just 10 seconds to go, and sits tied for second in goals (three) and tied for second in points (five) through the prelims. Svensson leads all players in shots with 29 and had the other goal in the quarterfinal defeat in Brampton. Meanwhile, Olsson owns a tournament-leading 72.15% faceoff percentage, which puts her slightly ahead of Marie-Philip Poulin, and Söderberg has been terrific again, allowing only four goals in three games.

A Look Back 

Canada remains unbeaten against the Swedes at Women’s Worlds, owning an 11-0 record. New York has also been historically good to Canada when it comes to playing Sweden; it owns a 4-1 record in the Empire State, with the last meeting occurring at the 2013 4 Nations Cup in Lake Placid. Natalie Spooner scored twice to help the Canadians to a 4-3 win.

All-time record: Canada leads 79-2-1
Canada goals: 509 
Sweden goals: 70 

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Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. United States

Monday, April 8 | 7 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Preliminary Round

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 07, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. UNITED STATES (APRIL 8)

Canada’s National Women's Team faces a familiar foe as the preliminary round comes to a close at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, taking on its neighbours to the south in a battle of unbeatens with first place in Group A on the line.

Last Game

Canada made made it back-to-back-back wins and back-to-back shutouts Sunday, blanking Czechia 5-0. Kristin O'Neill led the way with three points, scoring twice and adding an assist in the first period, Danielle Serdachny, Renata Fast and Laura Stacey also scored, and Ann-Renée Desbiens stopped all 13 shots she faced as Canada outshot the Czechs 42-13.

The United States outlasted Finland 5-3 on Saturday night for its third-consecutive win in the preliminary round. Kendall Coyne Schofield, who scored twice, Abbey Murphy, Hilary Knight and Taylor Heise powered the Americans to victory.

Last Meeting 

For the second year in a row, Canada pulled off a reverse sweep over the United States, downing it 6-1 in Game 7 of the Rivalry Series in St. Paul, Minnesota, on Feb. 11. Natalie Spooner and Emma Maltais each found the back of the net twice, while Marie-Philip Poulin and Ashton Bell also scored. Desbiens was excellent, stopping 24 of 25 to record the victory.

What to Watch 

Although it has been quiet through two games, Canada’s top line of Sarah Filler, Marie-Philip Poulin and Brianne Jenner have been very good against the Americans over the years. The trio have a combined 132 points (69-63—132) in 197 games all-time against the U.S., and Jenner had two goals the last time the rivals met at Women’s Worlds. Oh, and for those keeping track, Jenner is just two goals away from 50 with Canada’s National Women’s Team, which would make her just the 13th to reach that milestone.

The Americans are leaning on their big guns, with Coyne Schofield, Knight, Alex Carpenter and Caroline Harvey ranking in the top six in tournament scoring, with Coyne Schofield – who missed last year’s Women’s Worlds before giving birth to son Drew in July – leading the way with six points (3-3—6). Knight, of course, is the leading scorer in the history of the IIHF Women’s World Championship, with the five points she has accumulated through three games giving her 106 (63-43—106) in her storied career.

A Look Back 

Canada owns a 5-3-1 record against the United States in New York. The last time these two teams did battle in the Empire State was in the preliminary round at the 2013 4 Nations Cup in Lake Placid. Canada won that one 4-2 thanks to goals from Jenner, Spooner, Haley Irwin and Mélodie Daoust.

All-time record: Canada leads 104-78-1 (23-19 in OT/SO)
Canada goals: 508
United States goals: 444

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Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Czechia

Sunday, April 7 | 3 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Preliminary Round

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 06, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. CZECHIA (APRIL 7) 

Canada’s National Women's Team looks to make it three in a row in prelim play when it takes on Czechia at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship on Sunday afternoon.

Last Game 

Canada made it back-to-back wins with a 3-0 shutout victory over Switzerland on Friday. Emma Maltais got Canada on the board just 70 seconds after the puck dropped, Sarah Nurse scored less than seven minutes later and Sarah Filler added an empty-netter late in the third period. Emerance Maschmeyer was terrific in a 17-save effort, posting her sixth career shutout in just 13 starts at Women’s Worlds.

The Czechs found themselves on the wrong end of a 6-0 result against the United States on Friday. Klara Peslarova stayed busy between the pipes, making double-digit saves in every period and finishing with 42 stops. Czechia had five power plays in the first 25 minutes but couldn’t find the back of the net, and no skater registered more than two shots.

Last Meeting 

It was exactly one year ago to the day that the Canadians and Czechs clashed for the first time, meeting in the preliminary round at Women’s Worlds in Brampton. Marie-Philip Poulin scored pair of goals, including the 100th of her decorated international career, Blayre Turnbull added a goal and three assists, and Brianne Jenner and Jocelyne Larocque had two helpers each as part of a 5-1 win for Canada.

What to Watch 

How about the trio of Maltais, Nurse and Natalie Spooner? All three found the scoresheet against the Swiss – Maltais and Nurse with goals, Spooner with an assist – and Maltais has tallied the game-winner in both games in Utica. Add in the pre-tournament win over Finland in Kingston (Maltais and Nurse had a goal and an assist each, and Spooner added a helper) and the PWHL Toronto teammates have been driving the offence for Canada.

Seventeen-year-old Adela Sapovaliova is the one to watch on the ice, but we’ll turn our attention behind the bench. The Czechs have won 11 of 16 games and a pair of bronze medals since Carla MacLeod took over as head coach prior to the 2022 Women’s Worlds, with all five defeats coming at the hands of Canada and the U.S. The PWHL Ottawa bench boss is no stranger to international hockey; she won two Olympic gold medals (2006, 2010) and a world title (2007) with Canada’s National Women’s Team, and was MVP of the 2009 Women’s Worlds.

A Look Back 

Not much history to talk about here; as mentioned above, the meeting last year in Brampton was their first.

All-time record: Canada leads 1-0-0
Canada goals: 5 
Czechia goals: 1 

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Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Switzerland

Friday, April 5 | 3 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Preliminary Round

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 05, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. SWITZERLAND (APRIL 5) 

It’s a very quick turnaround for Canada’s National Women's Team, which resumes preliminary-round play Friday when it takes on Switzerland at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, less than 18 hours after closing out its tournament opener.

Last Game 

Canada opened the prelims on a historic note, picking up its 100th Women’s Worlds win by downing Finland 4-1 on Thursday night. Ella Shelton had a goal and two assists, Julia Gosling scored in her world championship debut and Ann-Renée Desbiens was terrific in a 32-save performance.

The Swiss started with a 4-0 loss to the host Americans on Wednesday. Andrea Brändli was busy between the pipes, finishing with 51 saves, but Switzerland could manage just 11 shots on the U.S. goal, with a team-high three coming from 18-year-old Ivana Wey in her first Women’s Worlds game.

Last Meeting 

Canada and Switzerland last faced off in the semifinals at the 2023 IIHF Women’s World Championship in Brampton. Sarah Fillier scored a hat trick, Natalie Spooner set up three goals, and Jamie Lee Rattray and Rebecca Johnston added a goal each as the Canadians booked their place in the gold medal game with a 5-1 victory.

What to Watch 

Two words. Sarah Fillier. She may have been held off the scoresheet against the Finns, but the Georgetown, Ontario, product has been historically good against the Swiss. In eight career games, Fillier has recorded 15 points (9-6—15), including four goals and a helper in two meetings a year ago in Brampton. Of course, she has been pretty darn good against anybody at Women’s Worlds, putting up 28 points (15-13—28) in 22 games on the international stage.

For the Swiss, it has to be Alina Müller. The lone PWHL player on the Swiss roster, Müller – the No. 3 pick in the inaugural PWHL Draft – is having a great season for Boston, putting up a team-leading 13 points (3-10—13) in 19 games. She’s also been pretty good internationally, recording four goals and 10 points in seven games a year ago in Brampton – including the lone goal for Switzerland in its semifinal loss to Canada – and posting the same stat line at the 2022 Olympics in Beijing.

A Look Back 

Canada hasn’t played the Swiss often in the grand scheme, facing off just 19 times since 1997, but they’ve been frequent foes lately, facing off in the prelims and semifinals at each of the last three Women’s Worlds, and in Beijing.

Prior to their final-four face-off in Brampton, the Canadians and Swiss met in the prelim opener for both; in that one, Spooner and Sarah Nurse led the way with a goal and an assist each, and Desbiens posted a 12-save shutout in a 4-0 win for Canada.

All-time record: Canada leads 19-0-0
Canada goals: 152 
Switzerland goals: 9 

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Canada vs. Finland

Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Finland

Thursday, April 4 | 7 p.m. ET | Utica, New York | Preliminary Round

Nicholas Pescod
|
April 04, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. FINLAND (APRIL 4) 

Let the games begin! Canada’s National Women's Team kicks off preliminary round play Thursday at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, facing off against Finland at the Adirondack Bank Center. 

Last Meeting 

Canada earned an 8-2 pre-tournament victory over Finland last Saturday in Kingston, Ontario, scoring the game’s final seven goals to erase a second-period deficit. In all, seven different skaters found the back of the net, led by Blayre Turnbull, who scored twice and added an assist in the exhibition win. 

Last Game 

We already talked about the last game, so how about the one before that? Canada scored a 6-1 victory over the United States in Game 7 of the Rivalry Series on Feb. 11 to complete the reverse sweep for the second year in a row in St. Paul, Minnesota. Natalie Spooner and Emma Maltais finished with two goals and an assist each for the Canadians, while Ann-Renée Desbiens made 24 saves.

Finland fell 4-0 to Czechia in its preliminary-round opener on Wednesday. Sanni Ahola stopped 29 of the 31 shots she faced — the Czechs had two empty-netters — in what was the first penalty-free game in Women's Worlds history. Noora Tulus led the way with four shots on goal for the Finns, who were outshot 33-21.

What to Watch 

With an average age of 28 years, two months and 20 days, Canada is icing its oldest roster ever at Women’s Worlds, with captain Marie-Philip Poulin back for her 12th appearance, veteran defender Jocelyne Larocque set for her 11th, and Spooner and Brianne Jenner both ready for their 10th. But head coach Troy Ryan has a few young guns at his disposal, including Sarah Fillier and Danielle Serdachny, both of whom were top-10 finalists for the Patty Kazmaier Award as the best player in NCAA women’s hockey, and cousins Julia and Nicole Gosling, who both registered their first Team Canada goals in the exhibition win Saturday.

Jenni Hiirikoski is returning for a record 16th Women's Worlds. The Finnish captain – seven times the Top Defender at the tournament – continues to be a big part of Finland's success on the international stage — she finished tied for fifth in scoring (3-8—11) a year ago in Brampton, second among all blue-liners. Petra Nieminen is also back following her stand-out performance last spring when she finished second in tournament scoring (6-7—13). The 24-year-old was red hot this year with Luleå HF in the Swedish Women’s Hockey League, leading the league with 24 goals and sitting fourth with 45 points in 33 regular-season games. 

A Look Back 

Canada may have the upper hand all-time, having lost just twice and tying once in 89 meetings, but the Finns are no pushover. 

These two teams have faced each other six previous times in the Empire State, the most recent coming in the 2013 4 Nations Cup gold medal game in Lake Placid, when Canada downed the Finns 6-3 to capture its 13th tournament title. Vicki Bendus had a goal and two assists, Jenelle Kohanchuk scored twice, and Jenner, Jennifer Wakefield and Haley Irwin were the other Canadian goal-scorers. 

All-time record: Canada leads 86-2-1 
Canada goals: 460 
Finland goals: 114 

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Canada vs. Finland

Women’s Worlds Preview: Canada vs. Finland

Saturday, March 30 | 3 p.m. ET | Kingston, Ontario | Pre-Tournament

Shannon Coulter
|
March 30, 2024

GAME NOTES: CANADA VS. FINLAND (MARCH 30)

Ahead of the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship in Utica, New York, Canada’s National Women's Team faces off against Finland in a pre-tournament tune-up Saturday at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston.

Last Meeting

Ahead of last year’s Women’s Worlds, Canada earned a 3-1 pre-tournament win over Finland in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Brianne Jenner broke a scoreless tie midway through the second period and added an assist on Marie-Philip Poulin’s insurance marker in the third. Emily Clark also scored for the Canadians, who got 19 combined saves from Ann-Renée Desbiens and Emerance Maschmeyer.

Last Game

Canada completed the reverse sweep again in the Rivalry Series, defeating the United States 6-1 in Game 7 in St. Paul, Minnesota, on Feb. 11. Natalie Spooner opened the scoring on the power play midway through the first period—her first of two goals. Poulin and Ashton Bell found the back of the net in the second period, and Emma Maltais scored two goals of her own in the third.

What to Watch

With the NCAA season complete, Canada’s roster has been bolstered by the addition of young talent. Sarah Fillier finished her senior season at Princeton with 30 goals and 43 points, and was named a top-10 finalist for the Patty Kazmaier Award as the best player in NCAA women’s hockey. Julia Gosling recorded career-highs during her senior year at St. Lawrence, notching 22 goals and 51 points, while Nicole Gosling (Julia’s cousin) finished her senior year at Clarkson with 14 goals and 39 points and was named a First Team All-American.

Petra Nieminen returns to Women’s Worlds after finishing second in tournament scoring (6-7—13) with the Finns a year ago in Brampton. The 24-year-old had 24 goals and 45 points during the regular season with Luleå HF in the Swedish Women’s Hockey League. In the PWHL, Susanna Tapani has been making an impact with Boston, recording a plus-12 rating along with three goals and eight points.

A Look Back

Although Canada has only a pair of losses and a tie in 88 all-time meetings with the Finns, the Nordic nation is always a tough matchup.

The teams have met before in Kingston. Throwing it back to 1996, Canada and Finland faced off at the inaugural 3 Nations Cup, with the Canadians winning 3-1. Lori Dupuis opened the scoring, while Amanda Benoit notched the game-winning goal off a pass from Angela James. Nancy Deschamps added an insurance goal in the third period.

All-time record: Canada leads 85-2-1
Canada goals: 452
Finland goals: 112

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Canada’s National Women’s Team announced for 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship

Twenty silver medallists from 2023 will wear Maple Leaf in Utica, NY

NR.012.24
|
March 07, 2024

CALGARY, Alberta – Hockey Canada has announced the 23 players named to Canada’s National Women’s Team who will look to reclaim the gold medal at the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, April 3-14 in Utica, New York.

Three goaltenders, seven defence and 13 forwards were selected by general manager Gina Kingsbury (Rouyn-Noranda, QC/Toronto, PWHL), head coach Troy Ryan (Spryfield, NS/Toronto, PWHL) and Cherie Piper (Scarborough, ON), senior manager of player development and scouting. Assistant coaches Kori Cheverie (New Glasgow, NS/Montréal, PWHL), Courtney Kessel (Mississauga, ON/Boston, PWHL) and Caroline Ouellette (Montréal, QC/Concordia University, RSEQ), along with goaltending consultant Brad Kirkwood (Calgary, AB/Toronto, PWHL), also provided input.

The 23 players selected include:

 

  • Two players who will be making their IIHF Women’s World Championship debut (Julia Gosling, Nicole Gosling)
  • 20 players who captured a silver medal at the 2023 IIHF Women’s World Championship in Brampton (Ambrose, Bourbonnais, Campbell, Clark, Desbiens, Fast, Fillier, Jenner, Larocque, Maltais, Maschmeyer, Nurse, O’Neill, Poulin, Rattray, Serdachny, Shelton, Spooner, Stacey, Turnbull)

 

“It is always a difficult decision when it comes to the final selection process, but we challenged our coaching staff to look at our entire athlete pool and determine who we felt would give us the best chance at competing for a gold medal,” said Kingsbury. “We are extremely excited and confident in these 23 players, a group with championship experience, veteran leadership, character and youth, and we are excited for the journey to begin.”

The 10-team tournament features Canada in Group A with Czechia, Finland, Switzerland and the host United States, while Group B includes China, Denmark, Germany, Japan and Sweden.

Canada opens Women’s Worlds against Finland on April 4, and faces Switzerland on April 5 and Czechia on April 7 before closing out the preliminary round against its rivals from the United States on April 8.

Prior to the start of the tournament, Canada will play a pre-tournament game against Finland at 3 p.m. ET on March 30 at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston, Ontario, home of the Kingston Frontenacs of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL). Fans can secure their tickets when they go on sale to the public on Friday, March 8 at 10 a.m. ET. Tickets start at $20, plus applicable fees, and are available at HockeyCanada.ca/Tickets.

TSN and RDS, the official broadcast partners of Hockey Canada, will carry extensive game coverage throughout the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championship, broadcasting all preliminary-round games, quarterfinals, semifinals and medal games from the Adirondack Bank Center. RDS will provide coverage of all Team Canada games, in addition to two quarterfinalss, both semifinals and medal games.

For more information from the International Ice Hockey Federation, please visit the official tournament site at 2024.womensworlds.hockey.   

In 22 appearances at the IIHF Women’s World Championship, Canada has captured 12 gold medals (1990, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2007, 2012, 2021, 2022), in addition to nine silver (2005, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2023) and one bronze (2019).

For more information on Hockey Canada and Canada’s National Women’s Team, please visit HockeyCanada.ca or follow through social media on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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Two players high-five on the ice.

Enhancing academics with HCSA

From engaging students throughout the school day to growing the game in their community, Hockey Canada Skills Academies contribute to a unique experience for students

Katie Brickman
|
February 22, 2024

Creating an opportunity where students can learn new skills, build confidence and create lasting relationships is what educators like Shaune Beatty and Brett Cameron strive for in and out of the classroom.

Having the Hockey Canada Skills Academy (HCSA) available at their schools has been impactful for their students.

“The HCSA brings a lot of different opportunities for the students,” says Beatty, superintendent of school operations and supervisor of the HCSA for the Good Spirit School Division in Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

Good Spirit brought the skills academy to its schools to encourage a new culture, bring in new students and grow the game in its communities. The HCSA has been in Yorkton for four years now.

“Some of our academies have seven kids, including a few who have never played the game before,” Beatty says. “Some classes have even done equipment drives to help make the game more accessible and promote the growth of the game.”

Over 120 students across seven schools in Yorkton participate in the HCSA. For many, it allows students to engage with academics in a way that interests them.

“The feedback I’ve received is around the whole idea of engagement—the kids look forward to going to school and it breaks up the day,” Beatty says. “It’s about engagement at a different level outside of the classroom that the kids tell me they enjoy the most.”

The objective of the HCSA program is to enhance academic achievement through a balance of academics and athletics, while also improving their hockey skills.

“We’ve had two boys go through the HCSA program in our community and they have gone on to larger academies. It is great to see those that are motivated get those greater opportunities,” said Beatty.

As a former hockey player himself, Cameron tries his best to relay as much of the information he gained while playing to his students at Miramichi Valley High School in Miramichi, New Brunswick.

“I am just trying to pass along my knowledge of the game through our program,” Cameron says.

The HCSA at Miramichi Valley began in the fall of 2020 and has grown quickly. Originally, it was offered in one semester for Grades 9 and 10 and in the French Immersion program. In 2021, it was offered in French and English in both semesters. Now, there are 24 co-ed students per semester that participate in the program with different levels of ability.

“The smiles don’t leave their faces the entire time they are on the ice,” Cameron says. “Everyone has gotten better at their own pace … they are able to refine their skills and enjoy the game.”

Not only is the HCSA at Miramichi Valley teaching students fundamental hockey skills, but they also get an opportunity to get their officiating and coaching certifications, too.

“There is a true benefit to how it extends well past just hockey,” Cameron says. “It is so good to see the kids improve and work on and off the ice on their skills. The kids don’t always see it [improvement] in the classroom, but you can see the changes they are making and how they are becoming stronger and better week to week.”

The benefit isn’t just about the kids either. Cameron coaches AAA hockey in the community, and being the head instructor, along with a history and physical education teacher, he has noticed how being an HCSA operator has helped him as well.

“It makes me a better coach. All this time and effort put into the program has helped me when I coach my own team,” he says. “I am very grateful for the opportunity to teach these kids the game of hockey and all the fundamentals that come with it, but it is also about the other pieces that they get through the program as well.”

There are many special moments for the students through the HCSA, but one stands out for Cameron. Last fall, the Maritimes hosted the World Junior A Hockey Challenge in Truro, Nova Scotia, and a former HCSA player, Max Jardine, played in the tournament. All the current HCSA students went to the game to watch Jardine play at a high level.

“It showed them what they could achieve if they wanted to,” Cameron says. “It was great for our non-high-level kids to see someone at that level play.”

As the HCSA program continues to grow to over 150 schools in eight provinces, Cameron shares his advice for other operators: “The goal should be to meet the kids where they are, but not leave them there. Kids will get the most enjoyment and confidence from being taught properly and seeing improvement in their own skills over the course of the semester.”

For Beatty, the most value is when the academies build partnerships within the communities to reduce the hurdles smaller schools can face.

“Think beyond your higher skilled hockey players. Those will undoubtedly become more skilled through the additional ice time, but some of the best stories I’ve heard come from the less experienced and new players to the game,” he says. “A part of a successful HCSA is to grow the game by bringing in players that come with an interest in the game. These are students first and hockey players second, but get them in and make them players for life.”

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For more information:

Esther Madziya
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 284-6484 

[email protected] 

Spencer Sharkey
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 777-4567

[email protected]

Jeremy Knight
Manager, Corporate Communications
Hockey Canada

(647) 251-9738

[email protected]

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