Canada 8 Vs. Sweden 1

Canada 8 vs. Sweden 1

Preliminary Round
Monday, December 27, 2004
Grand Forks, ND
Ralph Engelstad Arena

Canada vs Sweden | Team Notes - pdf

CANADA POWERS BY SWEDEN
Canada dominates Sweden in game fueled by physical play;
Richards named Player of the Game.

By: Derrik T. Sovak

The Ralph Engelstad Arena in Grand Forks, N.D. could have been mistaken for a home game for Canada’s World Junior Team. The sea of red and white jerseys and painted faces made for an unbalanced atmosphere on day three of the 2005 World Junior Championship.  Canada made the ‘home crowd’ happy, with an 8-1 win over Sweden.

“It was really loud in the building. It was a lot like Winnipeg, not as loud, but the emotion was there,” said Team Canada captain Michael Richards. Richards was named player of the game despite not scoring any points in the contest. “He’s been our bread and butter on the penalty kill,” said Sutter.

“You can’t control the officiating, and I didn’t want our guys to let that bring them down.[Richards] plays with discipline and a lot of heart.”

Monday’s preliminary game between Canada and Sweden got off to a chippy start. The crowd, which was in overwhelming favor of Team Canada, started their chants of “Go Canada go!” and it continued in the concourses of the Ralph Engelstad Arena in between periods.

Penalties were a big part of the game. Between the two teams, 16 penalties were handed out with Canada being called on a total of nine penalties.

Twenty-one seconds into the first period, Sweden took a two-minute penalty for high-sticking which gave Canada momentum and eventually led to a goal by Jeff Carter at 2:28.

A Canadian penalty to Danny Syvret led to a Sweden power play goal at 7:29 when Fredriksson was left open in front of Canada goaltender Jeff Glass and beat him to tie the score at 1-1.

In a physical contest, Canada kept the momentum despite being in almost constant penalty trouble. “We wanted to keep our focus up, even in penalty trouble,” said Canada head coach Brent Sutter. “We didn’t want to have a let down like we did [on Saturday].”

Carter was whistled for hooking at 13:42 of the first period. The penalties didn’t stop there. At 17:26, Team Canada’s Nigel Dawes was called for slashing and Clarke MacArthur was called at 18:39 to give Sweden the 5-on-3 man advantage.

“We had a lot of power plays, and we killed a lot,” said Colin Fraser after the game. “You don't want to give them any time; they've got a lot of skill.”

Canada didn’t abandon its offence, getting two scoring chances even when they were two men short.

Canada outshot Sweden 16-4 in the first period but the game was tied at 1.

Canada scored another early-period goal 52 seconds into the second period as MacArthur made it a 2-1 game.  Sweden took an interference penalty at the 1:32 mark. At the 3:39 mark of the second period, Nigel Dawes scored on the powerplay to give Canada a two-goal lead.

Penalties to Fraser, Patrice Bergeron and Shea Weber over a four-minute span meant Canada was two men for a three minute sequence. The Red and White specialty teams managed to kill off the two-man advantage and then Sweden’s Robert Nilsson was called for unsportsmanlike conduct (for diving) to take the burden off.

Canada pulled further away when Bergeron tallied on an assist from Brent Seabrook.

A powerplay led to Canada’s fifth goal of the game when Sidney Crosby scored his third goal of the WJC on a pass from Bergeron only ten seconds into the power play at 15:11 of the second period.

Canada continued to dominate on the shot clock, out shooting Sweden 18-4 in the middle frame.

Twenty-one seconds into the third, Crosby scored his second goal of the game.  Sweden changed goaltenders but the result was the same, as Andrew Ladd took all of 25 seconds to put Canada up 7-1.

Ryan Getzlaf scored at the 12:32 mark of the third period to increase Canada’s lead to 8-1. There was no further scoring as Canada picked up its second victory in WJC preliminary play.

“We played a consistent sixty minutes of hockey tonight,” said Sutter. “I thought we were better as a team than we were last game.”

Canada’s National Junior Team is back in action Tuesday night against Germany to continue preliminary round action at the 2005 World Junior Championship.

Box Score CAN
1
4
3
8
Compte SWE
1
0
0
1

First Period/Première période

Scoring/Buts:
2.28 | 1 - 0 EQ | Canada | 7. CARTER, Jeff (15. GETZLAF, Ryan)
7.29 | 1 - 1 PP1 | Sweden | 19. FREDRIKSSON, David
(18. VIDELL, Linus, 20. SVANBERG, Ola)

Penalties/Pénalités:
0.21 | 2 min | Sweden | 19. FREDRIKSSON, David | Highsticking
4.13 | 2 min | Sweden | 19. FREDRIKSSON, David | Tripping
6.54 | 2 min |Canada | 20. SYVRET, Danny |Hooking
8.01 | 2 min | Sweden | 12. GROSSMANN, Nicklas | Cross-checking
13.42 | 2 min | Canada | 7. CARTER, Jeff | Hooking
17.26 | 2 min | Canada | 27. DAWES, Nigel | Slashing
18.39 | 2 min | Canada | 17. MACARTHUR, Clarke | Tripping

Second Period/Deuxième période

Scoring/Buts:
20.52 | 2 - 1 EQ | Canada | 17. MACARTHUR, Clarke
(18. RICHARDS, Mike, 11. FRASER, Colin)
23.39 | 3 - 1 EQ| Canada | 27. DAWES, Nigel
(20. SYVRET, Danny, 14. DIXON, Stephen)
32.49 | 4 - 1 EQ | Canada | 37. BERGERON, Patrice (2. SEABROOK, Brent)
35.11 | 5 - 1 PP1 | Canada | 9. CROSBY, Sidney
(37. BERGERON, Patrice, 24. PERRY, Corey)

Penalties/Pénalités:
21.32 | 2 min | Sweden | 11. OLSSON, Kalle | Interference
25.21 | 2 min| Canada | 11. FRASER, Colin | Highsticking
25.44 | 2 min | Canada | 7. CARTER, Jeff | Slashing
26.42 | 2 min | Canada | 6. WEBER, Shea | Cross-checking
28.21 | 2 min | Sweden | 9. NILSSON, Robert | Other misconducts
35.01 | 2 min | Sweden | 27. SODERBERG, Carl |Holding
35.53 | 2 min | Canada | 15. GETZLAF, Ryan | Cross-checking
39.41 | 2 min | Sweden | 12. GROSSMANN, Nicklas | Tripping

Third Period/Troisième période

Scoring/Buts:
40.21 | 6 - 1 PP1 | Canada | 9. CROSBY, Sidney (24. PERRY, Corey)
40.46 | 7 - 1 EQ | Canada | 19. LADD, Andrew (15. GETZLAF, Ryan)
52.32 | 8 - 1 EQ | Canada | 15. GETZLAF, Ryan
(7. CARTER, Jeff, 2. SEABROOK, Brent)

Penalties/Pénalités:
46.34 | 2 min | Canada | 7. CARTER, Jeff | Slashing
49.31 | 2 min | Sweden | 4. GRANAT, Elias | Elbowing
58.12 | 2 min | Sweden | 11. OLSSON, Kalle | Tripping


Goaltenders CAN GLASS, Jef
Gardiens de but SWE HEINO-LINDBERG, Christopher
RAUTIO BERGUV, David -3rd 40:21

Shots on Goal Team

1 p

2 p

3 p

Final

Shots on Goal CAN

15

9

14

38

Tirs au but SWE

3

5

8

14


Referee/Arbitre MINAR Milan 
Linesmen/Juges des lignes VALACH Miroslav, REDDING Kevin

Attendance/Assistance 10,739

CANADA WINS 8-1 ON SWEDEN

Canada handed Sweden a 8-1 defeat on Monday in Grand Forks, ND at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship and sits atop Group B.   

In the first period, Jeff Carter opened the scoring on a powerplay at 2:28, with a one-timer that beat Swedish goaltender Chris Heino-Lindberg cleanly.   

Sweden tied the game at 1-1 on its own powerplay at 7:29, as David Fredriksson fired a quick wrist over Jeff Glass’ glove.  

Clarke MacArthur made it 2-1, moments after stepping out of the penalty box, converting a great effort by Colin Fraser.  Nigel Dawes fired home his first of the Championship, at 3:39 and Canada had a two-goal advantage.  At 12:49, it was Patrice Bergeron who outwaited the Swedish goaltender for his third of the Championship.

At 15:11, ten seconds into the powerplay, Sidney Crosby scored while falling down from an almost impossible angle.

In the third period, Canada proved they were not going to let up as they did against Slovakia.  Crosby, with his second, scored on the powerplay at 0:21.  That was the end for Swedish goaltender Heino-Lindberg who gave way to David Rautio Berguv.  Berguv was greeted 26 seconds later by a Canada goal, as Andrew Ladd scored his first international goal, going five-goal on the new arrival.

Ryan Getzlaf added a goal in the third to make the final 8-1.

Canada outshot Sweden 45-17and next faces Germany on Tuesday, in Grand Forks. All of Canada’s games are broadcast live on TSN and RDS.

CANADA TAKES 5-1 LEAD ON SWEDEN

Canada has taken a 5-1 lead on Sweden, with four goals in a dominant second period.

Clarke MacArthur made it 2-1, moments after stepping out of the penalty box, converting a great effort by Colin Fraser.  Nigel Dawes fired home his first of the Championship, at 3:39 and Canada had a two-goal advantage.  At 12:49, it was Patrice Bergeron who outwaited the Swedish goaltender for his third of the Championship.

At 15:11, ten seconds into the powerplay, Sidney Crosby scored while falling down from an almost impossible angle.

In the first period, Jeff Carter opened the scoring on a powerplay at 2:28, with a one-timer that beat Swedish goaltender Chris Heino-Lindberg cleanly.   

Sweden tied the game at 1-1 on its own powerplay at 7:29, as David Fredriksson fired a quick wrist over Jeff Glass’ glove.

ALL TIED UP AFTER FIRST PERIOD

Canada is facing Sweden tonight in its second round robin game at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship and it’s a 1-1 tie through twenty minutes of play.  Sweden is considered by many as one of the pre-tournament favorites, having captured a European Under-20 Event earlier this fall.

Jeff Carter opened the scoring on a powerplay at 2:28 of the first period, with a one-timer that beat Swedish goaltender Chris Heino-Lindberg cleanly.   

Sweden tied the game at 1-1 on its own powerplay at 7:29, as David Fredriksson fired a quick wrist over Jeff Glass’ glove.  

---
Canada and Sweden are underway in round robin action at the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship in Grand Forks, ND.  Canada has an all-time 18-7-1 record against Sweden, and defeated Sweden 8-2 in their last WJHC game at the 2003 event in Halifax.  Follow the game live on TSN and RDS.

CANADA VS. SWEDEN PREVIEW
By Derrik T. Sovak

As Canada’s National Junior team was stretching around center ice, head coach Brent Sutter skated slowly around his team. “Let’s go, let’s go,” he persisted.

Team Canada is preparing for its second game of the 2005 World Junior Hockey Championship. After handedly defeating Slovakia 7-3 in its first game, both the coaches and players are anxious to play again.

With Canada considered by many one of the favorites to win this year’s championship, they face a possible sleeper opponent in Sweden. Sweden has struggled in recent years, but has the potential to win games in this years’ World Juniors.

Team Canada will rely on its speed and agility to beat Sweden. Canada’s head scout Blair Mackasey knows of Sweden’s potential. “I see very skilled athletes,” said Mackasey. “They have good speed, and size and skill wise, we’re comparable teams.”

“If we don’t play well we’ll lose,” Mackasey added. “They don’t always play as hard as they should, though.”

Just like with their win over Slovakia, Team Canada will have to set the pace for the game to be successful. “You want them to get down early,” Mackasey said. “If Sweden plays a disciplined hockey game they will have a chance to score goals.”

Canada will also look to tighten up its game coming down the final stretch. Saturday’s third period looked ho-hum for Team Canada, but that’s something Sutter doesn’t worry too much about. “Its not like we need to improve our entire game,” Sutter said. “We won, but there are things we can work on.”

Coach Sutter also feels that the win was a strong one, but some things need improving. “There were lots of goods and only a few bad things I saw,” said Sutter. “We used today’s practice to work on some things as a team that we needed to improve on as a team.”

One thing Canada doesn’t need help with is scoring, especially against Sweden. The last time the two teams met, Canada beat the Swedes 8-2. But no Team Canada member is pushing this game aside.

“All the European teams can really skate well, Sweden is no exception to that,” said Clarke MacArthur.

“It’s going to be a good hard game.” Sutter added that his team is ready for tomorrow’s game. We had a hard, crisp skate this morning. We went over some things as a team and we’ll be ready for them.”

Stephen Dixon knows how Sweden plays.  Dixon has played against many of Sweden’s team members in the World Under-18 Championship. “We’re going to have to bring our ‘A’ game,” Dixon said. “Sweden always has a fast team. They have a lot of bigger guys, and play a little more of a physical game.” He added that, “Its not going to be an easy game.”

Shawn Belle also has some experience playing Sweden. “From what I remember, Team Sweden was pretty hard checking (at the U-18 Championship),” said Belle “They had a couple of guys that were really skilled and, for the most part, they worked really hard.”

For the time being, Team Canada will set their entire focus on beating Sweden tomorrow. “Tomorrow’s game is the most important game we’ll play at the tournament,” Sutter said. “And, after that game, the next game will be the most important of the tournament.”

Team Canada will face off against Team Sweden on Monday, December 27th in preliminary round action at 3:30 p.m. (Eastern) at the Ralph Engelstad Arena in Grand Forks, N.D.

For more information:
André Brin Director, Communications | Directeur, communications